6 Ways a Medical Appointment Is Like a Job Interview

You’ve probably heard the advice that you should write down questions for your doctor before an appointment but that is usually not enough when you are dealing with a rare or complex disease.  Did you know that doctors are taught a ‘medical interview’ that they use as the framework of your appointment?  By approaching your appointment like you would a job interview, you can learn how to better communicate and collaborate with your doctor, resulting in a stronger relationship and better care for you. 

Let’s look at the way an appointment or ‘medical interview’ is similar to a job interview.

  1. You need to be prepared and ready to answer the questions that are being asked.
    You have probably been asked the typical interview questions like  ‘What are your strengths?’ or ‘Where do you see yourself in 5 years?’  The first time you heard them, you may have stumbled and stammered a semi-intelligible...
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Our Broken Medical System

Our medical system has changed a lot over the last 20 years, especially for the doctors working in the system.

Intuitively and through our own experiences, we can see that doctors are struggling with the changes including high levels of burnout, frustration and even an increased rate of suicide. 

So, what is it that is causing the doctors’ struggles? 

Based on a 2018 survey, doctors reported their top two least satisfying factors about medical practice as listed below.

EHR design/interoperability                  39.2% 

Regulatory/insurance requirements    37.6% 

Loss of clinical autonomy                       37.0% 

Professional liability/malpractice          30.2% 

Amount of time with patients                12.4% 

Income/compensation ...

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3 Ways to Help Our Rare Disease Doctors

If you have been in the rare disease world for any length of time, you have likely heard of a rare disease expert who has closed their practice, retired from patient care,  been pushed out of a larger organization, or opened a private pay clinic.

Experts like Dr. Korson dealing with mitochondrial disease, Dr. Afrin working with mast cell diseases, Dr. Boris and Dr. Schofield focusing on autonomic issues like POTS, and many others, have left leaving even more patients without appropriate or even adequate care.

The sad part is that it is rarely the doctor's choice to step back from rare disease patient care.  Often, the rare disease doctor’s practice is seen as too risky, too controversial, not productive enough because of long appointments and high resource needs, or not financially lucrative.

Why does this keep happening and what can we do to help our rare disease experts help us get the care we need?

Let’s start by looking at the reasons our rare disease...

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